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    « Comic Sans and Getting the Details Right | Main | Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think »
    Tuesday
    Oct232012

    Housecleaning as a perk? It's about reducing decisions

    Yesterday at Fistful of Talent in the latest '5 Things You Need to Know This Week' compilation, Holland Dombeck included a link to this piece from Business Insider - 'Evernote Pays For Each Of Its 250 Employees To Have Their Houses Cleaned Twice Per Month', which on the surface reads mostly like another one of those classic and almost cliche, 'Tech company perks that your business would never even consider', kinds of pieces.

    I mean, we've all read enough stories about free gourmet meals, onsite car detailing services, anything goes dress codes, and even more out of the ordinary types of perks and benefits that tech companies have been known to create and bestow upon their employees. And for most of us that do not work in one of these small or start-up tech companies, our reaction to these stories is pretty standard - variously choosing from the following:  they won't work in our culture, won't scale to our size, are somehow 'unfair', and since none of our industry or location benchmarks say we have to offer them to be competitive, then we don't have to worry about them. They make for a cute story, (and easy blog fodder), but that's it.

    It was with that kind of practiced cynicism I too read the Business Insider piece about Evernote, but digging into the story just a bit deeper, buried in the original New York Times piece that BI essentially summarized, we find this gem of a quote from an Evernote employee, when asked about the 'free housecleaning' perk:

    Given that his employer is paying to clean his apartment, (Evernote VP of Marketing), Mr. Sinkov and his girlfriend do not have to quibble about cleanup duties. The value of the perk is greater than the money saved, he said.

    “It eliminates a decision I have to make,” Mr. Sinkov said. “It’s just happening and it’s good, and I don’t have to think about it.”

    Hmm.

    The perk is valuable because it 'eliminates a decision I have to make'.

    That sounds familiar, no?  Well it should to regular readers of this blog, as very recently I posted about two separate stories about the importance of reducing (often unnecessary), decision making, as shared by President Obama and the President of the Internet, Mark Zuckerberg.

    It's not about the cash value of the perk - I suspect Mr. Sinkov can afford to pay to have his house cleaned - but rather about removing from his day-to-day the need to think about it at all. 

    And what we saw in the Obama and Zuckerberg stories continues to resonate - if you want to really, truly, and fully do great work, maybe even your best work, then anything that distracts you too much from that work presents just another little barrier that you need to get over.

    And anything, even a simple perk like housecleaning, (or dog walking, or yard work, or time off for voting), can give people on your team just a little bit of help in what for most of us seems like a Monday to Friday mad dash to get everything done.

    Think about it - what can you do today to let your teams make just one less decision?

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      Steve's HR Technology - Journal - Housecleaning as a perk? It's about reducing decisions

    Reader Comments (2)

    I'm about to blog about this same article, but from the health and well-being perspective. These companies are moving beyond cash incentives and into meaningful incentives. I see what they're doing as an extension of making work a healthier environment and helping home be a healthier one too. I also see it as helping to reduce the pile-on of things -- often meaningless but time-consuming things -- that add pressure and stress to our lives and keep us from doing something more valuable, like talking with our spouse or taking a walk. Even if every company can't deliver home-cooked meals or a cleaner (sign me up!), they can adopt this frame of thinking.

    Fran
    @femelmed

    October 23, 2012 | Unregistered Commenterfran melmed

    Thanks Fran for those observations, all true and all important. There is a lot of positives that come from a benefit or at least an approach to benefits like Evernote has taken.

    October 25, 2012 | Registered CommenterSteve

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