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    « Housecleaning as a perk? It's about reducing decisions | Main | 'I will get in there and mix it up' »
    Monday
    Oct222012

    Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think

    The good folks at Careerbuilder recently released their 2012 Candidate Behavior Study, conducted in partnership with Inavero, and while the big, catchy conclusion from the study was boiled down to essentially read as 'Passive Candidates Don't Exist', I found even a more interesting, (to me anyway), finding from the study's data.

    According to the Careebuilder study, job candidates consult nearly 15 resources per job search, including company career sites, Facebook, online job boards, employer review sites (such as Glassdoor.com), professional and personal networks and staffing and recruiting firms – before they even decide to apply to a job. Below is a chart from the study showing how job search research stacks up against other, similarly important and complex purchasing decisions:

    Job Searching is complex

    While we have been talking for a while, (here just last Monday), about Human Resources and Recruiting looking and acting more like the classic Marketing function, but as I pointed out in my post last week, and the Careerbuilder study reinforces, Marketing is changing dramatically as well, making, especially for HR and Talent pros, the shift to more of a Marketing mindset even more challenging.

    From the report on the study's findings:

    It used to be that a consumer would go to the store and find something on the shelf for the first time and make the decision to purchase right then and there,” (Careerbuilder's) Barnes explains. “Today, however, thanks to technology that enables us to research and compare products – at any time of day, from anywhere – consumers are doing significant research on products before they even step into a store.

    Job candidates, we’re finding, are using this same approach to their job search.” For employers, these findings underscore the need to put as much effort into “marketing” their job opportunities and employment brand as they do their products, services and consumer brand. Candidates are utilizing multiple platforms to interact with employers, search for opportunities and find out what it’s like to work at companies – and they’re doing so increasingly through social media and from their mobile devices.

    That means employers need to explore and take advantage of the many and various opportunities to connect with candidates these platforms afford.

    Some quick thoughts on what this all might mean for you - the HR and Talent pro that might feel themselves in a position not at all unlike our friends over at a Big Box retailer like Best Buy, who watch shopper after shopper wander around the store, viewing and touching the merch, then immediately pulling out their iPhones to price check all over the internet, read product reviews, and figure out if their might be a better deal out there.

    1. You probably don't need to everywhere, but you need to be moving in that direction. If your candidates are hitting up as many as 15 sources of informaton to learn about your company and jobs, then having a wide (and deep) employer brand presence across multiple sources.

    2. True source of hire will become almost impossible to pinpoint. The candidate you eventually hired saw your opening via a job alert from Indeed, talked to a friend who used to work at your company, read some reviews on Glassdoor, checked out your Career site, then found someone in their LinkedIn network willing to forward their resume to the hiring manager. So - what was the source of hire?

    3. If HR and Recruiting is becoming the new Marketing, then HR pros are even more behind the game. The Careerbuilder report pulls pretty deeply from a Google-led marketing research project called the Zero Moment of Truth, (ZMOT). If you want to speak the language of the modern marketer and job seeker, then you probably need to know what the heck the ZMOT is and how it impacts your employment marketing efforts.

    I don't post about too many research reports, (honestly, there are too many to post about anyway), but I did learn a few things from the Careerbuilder research, and I recommend you check it out if you want some new insights into how candidates are searching for jobs, and how you can best adopt and adapt to these changes.

    Have a great Monday everyone!

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      Steve's HR Technology - Journal - Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think
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      Steve's HR Technology - Journal - Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think
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      Steve's HR Technology - Journal - Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think
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      Steve's HR Technology - Journal - Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think
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      Steve's HR Technology - Journal - Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think
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      Steve's HR Technology - Journal - Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think
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      Steve's HR Technology - Journal - Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think
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      Steve's HR Technology - Journal - Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think
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      Steve's HR Technology - Journal - Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think
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      Steve's HR Technology - Journal - Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think
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      Steve's HR Technology - Journal - Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think
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      Steve's HR Technology - Journal - Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think
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      Steve's HR Technology - Journal - Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think
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      Steve's HR Technology - Journal - Buying a car, choosing your next job - more similar than you think

    Reader Comments (1)

    Buying a car is one of the difficult task, because you need to observe several things or aspects. Quality and designing of the car, price of the car, efficiency, mileage, reliability etc etc. All these things need to be considered first and all are essential in case of a vehicle or car, if you want to buy.

    November 1, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterKevin

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