Quantcast
Subscribe!

 

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

 

E-mail Steve
This form does not yet contain any fields.
    Listen to internet radio with Steve Boese on Blog Talk Radio

    free counters

    Twitter Feed

    Entries in research (12)

    Wednesday
    Mar012017

    PODCAST - #HRHappyHour 277 - The Deloitte 2017 Global Human Capital Trends Report

    HR Happy Hour 277 - The 2017 Deloitte Global Human Capital Trends Report

    Host: Steve Boese

    Guest: Josh Bersin, Bersin by Deloitte

    Listen to the show HERE

    This week on the HR Happy Hour Show, we are joined by Josh Bersin, of Bersin by Deloitte, a leading consulting, research and advisory company to talk about some of the key findings and insights from the just released Deloitte 2017 Human Capital Trends Report.

    This annual report, now in its fifth year, looks at the key challenges, trends, and opportunities for HR and business leaders and serves as an educational resource and guide for HR leaders to help them think about their human capital challenges and how they might respond to these challenges.

    This year's report shared 10 Key Human Capital Trends and on the show, Josh talked about three of them in more detail - The Organization of the Future, The Employee Experience, and Diversity and Inclusion - all major themes of the report and ones that many organizations are tackling in 2017. Josh shared some insights from the research, (over 10,000 respondents), as well as from case studies, inteviews and additional research in these areas. Finally, Josh shared his recommendations for HR leaders on how to best utilize the information in the Global Human Capital Trends Report and how it can help guide conversations, prioritization, and HR strategy.

    You can listen to the show on the show page HERE, or by using the widget player below, (email and RSS subscribers click through)

    This was a fun and interesting show, thanks to Josh for taking the time to join us.

    Get the Deloitte 2017 Global Human Capital Trends Report here - highly recommend it to help understand and plan for the challenges ahead.

    Remember to subscribe to the HR Happy Hour Show on iTunes, Stitcher Radio and all the podcast apps - just search for 'HR Happy Hour' to subscribe and never miss a show.

    Monday
    Nov072016

    Working too much is (possibly) bad for your brain

    Quick question, if you had to guess, what do you think would be 'better' (for folks 40 and older), in terms of maintaining or even enhancing your overall cognitive abilities - I will give you two options, pick the one you think would be 'better'.

    1. Working at a full-time job that is a real grind, and putting in 60+ hours/week

    2. Doing more or less nothing in terms of paid employment, i.e., spending a lot of time playing video games, watching Netflix - that kind of thing

    Well, according to a recent research study published at the University of Melbourne, the guy sitting on the sofa binge watching The Walking Dead is probably better off, at least in terms of cognitive functioning, than the 60 hours/week work hero.Three Flags (1958), Jasper Johns

    So what might be the true, 'best' option to keep cognitive function from deteriorating as we get older?

    Unsurprisingly, the answer lies somewhere in between the two extremes of 'doing nothing' and 'probably working too much.'

    From the University of Melbourne's findings:

    Our findings show that there is a non-linearity in the effect of working hours on cognitive functioning. For working hours up to around 25 hours a week, an increase in working hours has a positive impact on cognitive functioning. However, when working hours exceed 25 hours per week, an increase in working hours has a negative impact on cognition. Interestingly, there is no statistical difference in the effects of working hours on cognitive functioning between men and women.

    This could be the greatest argument yet for the three day work week, at least for folks in the 40+ crowd, (is anyone actually arguing for a three day work week? Maybe I can start the groundswell here).

    But what is interesting about the research and the conclusions is how it more or less aligns with what most of us would intuitively feel to be the case - that being engaged in work helps keep the brain sharp, and the mental faculties in shape. It would be hard to argue, based on a personal and informal review of the losers in our lives, (I am looking at you, Mr. no-good brother in law), that sitting on the sofa all day is good for cognitive functioning.

    What might be surprising however is the pretty low weekly working hours threshold where cognitive function starts to decline. Twenty five hours per week is squarely in the 'part-time' category, and likely not the one in which most of us find ourselves in during the prime, (or what we think is the prime), of our working careers.

    So in sum the two things to at least think about are both pretty clear, and kind of obvious too.

    Lots of us are working too much, and all of this work might be having a negative impact on cognitive function, (not to mention family life, stress, physical health, etc.).

    But as we get older, working at least some, (up to 25 hours or so), is actually positive on a number of fronts, and should be a part of our planning as we age.

    Everything in moderation. Shocking, I know.

    And probably a good reminder as we hit Election Day tomorrow.

    Have a great week!

    Tuesday
    Sep272016

    What if everything I told you was wrong?

    If you are a fan of the video series TED Talks or have been to an HR conference or two in the past couple of years then you are probably familiar, or at least have heard of Harvard psychologist Amy Cuddy. Her work on something called 'power poses' has been the source of one of the most popular TED talks of all time, with something like 35 million views, a bestselling book titled 'Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges', and has been out on the speaking circuit for most of 2016 promoting the book.I'm the person not in the power pose

    The book's central theses: that leveraging body language in these 'power poses', (think standing tall, arms raised, chin up, chest out, etc.), can help us overcome things like anxiety, fear, lack of confidence and allow us to perform our best, (or at least better), in stressful situations like speeches, job interviews, or presentations. The book, the TED talk, and the speaking gigs all stem from the same source: a 2010 study titled Power Posing: Brief Nonverbal Displays Affect Neuroendocrine Levels and Risk Tolerance authored by Amy Cuddy along with Dana Carney and Andy Yap.

    From the 2010 paper's conclusion:

    Our results show that posing in high-power displays (as opposed to low-power displays) causes physiological, psychological, and behavioral changes consistent with the literature on the effects of power on power holders—elevation of the dominance hormone testosterone, reduction of the stress hormone cortisol, and increases in behaviorally demonstrated risk tolerance and feelings of power.

    It goes on a bit longer, but you get the idea. 'Power poses' can increase testosterone, improve our feelings of power, and help us perform under stress. Awesome to know this, as taking a minute or two to put yourself in a 'power pose' is about one of the easiest things I can think of to do.

    But....

    What if this actually isn't true? I mean what if the benefits and positive outcomes from adopting 'power poses' are really non-existent, or at least incredibly negliible? What would you think if you have watched Ms. Cuddy's TED talk 26 times, bought and read her book, or paid to attend a conference where she was a keynote speaker?

    Remember that 2010 research study at the core of the 'power pose' idea?

    Here is what one of the paper's co-authors, Dana Carney has to say today, as reported in Inc.com:

    There's only one problem: It (the effects of power poses), isn't real. Several subsequent studies following rigorous protocols were unable to reproduce the effect Cuddy and her co-authors found. Striking a power pose did not increase testosterone, associated with confidence, or decrease cortisol, associated with stress in these subsequent tests. And late last night, Dana Carney, one of Cuddy's co-authors on the original paper, published a document disavowing that research.

    She, Cuddy, and the other researchers weren't being dishonest, she explains, but they made some significant mistakes in their research. Their sample size of 47 was much too small. The people conducting the experiment mostly knew what outcome was being sought, which has a tendency to skew research results. The testosterone increase might have been caused by a different aspect of the experiment--people were given the opportunity to gamble and some of them won, which also increases testosterone.

    Considering all that was wrong with the original experiments and the fact that later experiments did not produce the same effect, she writes, "I do not have any faith in the embodied effects of 'power poses.' I do not think the effect is real." She goes on to say that she does not conduct research in this area herself and hasn't in years, nor does she teach the material to her students anymore. And she wants to discourage other researchers from pursuing power poses, which she believes are a dead end.

    If you read what Carney published essentially disavowing the research's validity and the follow-on from the marketing of the value of 'power poses' you will come away wondering just how silly it all sounds now. 

    Standing in the Wonder Woman pose for 45 seconds will actually make you act and think and seem like ,you know the actual Wonder Woman? That seems kind of dopey. 

    And it did to me back when I met Ms. Cuddy, (and where I got the pic you see above).

    She was one of the featured speakers at a conference I attended earlier this year, and I was invited to go back stage prior to her talk for a meet and great, get a copy of her book, and take a picture. Prior to that day I had not seen her TED talk, and frankly didn't know much, (anything) about her research and the book. I had never heard of a 'power pose'.

    But as I waited in the meet and greet line, I observed 10 or 12 people before me all take a picture with Ms. Cuddy, with the author and the conference attendee each proceeding to adopt the Wonder Woman pose you see Ms. Cuddy in the pic above. As I said, I never heard of the pose, kind of felt idiotic taking up the pose for the pic, and instead stood in what was for me a more comfortable, natural position.

    After taking the pic, and talking to some of the folks backstage, I was clued in to just what the Wonder Woman/Power Poses thing was all about. And I felt really stupid that I stood next to the world's foremost expert on Power Posing and took up a pose that (I later learned), was the exact opposite of what I should have done.

    I am standing with my arms folded in, am slightly hunched, (Ms. Cuddy is kind of short), and more or less look exactly like someone who had never heard of a Power Pose, and the benefits that such a pose provides.

    Long, long story short - I really have no idea if Power Posing creates any real benefit or value or not. I suppose even if it can't be scientifically proven, but it still makes one feel better and seemingly more confident, then it can't hurt.

    Just, in the future, if you have Ms. Cuddy speak at your Conference you may want to skip the awkward meet and great posing routine. It did feel dumb to me when I was there. And I'd feel even dumber if I had taken up the Wonder Woman pose only to find out a few months later that it doesn't actually, you know, do anything.

    Monday
    Sep192016

    PODCAST - Research on the Rocks #2 - Recruiting, Technology, and Candidate Experience

    Research on the Rocks #2 - Recruiting, Technology, and Candidate Experience

    Hosts: Madeline LauranoMollie Lombardi

    Guest: Gerry Crispin, CareerXroads

    Listen HERE

    Here at Research on the Rocks, we love talking about data. Luckily, we aren’t the only ones. On this week’s episode, we are live from IBM’s HR Summit in Boston with Gerry Crispin, co-founder of CareerXRoads and The Talent Board. He is in the process of gathering data for the Talent Board’s annual Candidate Experience survey where his team is currently, receiving 10,000 survey responses a DAY. So, we were more than a little excited to have Gerry as our first guest on the show. Listen in as we discuss IBM’s value proposition, the strategies for collecting and analyzing data, and why the word “best” isn’t exactly the best.

    You can listen to the show on the show page HERE, or by using the widget player below, (Email and RSS subscribers may need to click through)

     

     

    This was a fun and interesting show - thanks to Gerry for joining us!

    Remember to subsribe to Research on the Rocks and all your favorite HR Happy Hour Podcast Network shows on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, or your favorite podast player app. Just search for 'HR Happy Hour' to subscribe and never miss a show.

    Tuesday
    Aug092016

    PODCAST - #HRHappyHour 253 - Introducing Research on the Rocks

    Last week I shared the HR Happy Hour Podcast Network launch announcement, and today I am really pleased and excited to share the details of the first new show on the network - the debut episode of Research on the Rocks, with hosts Madeline Laurano and Mollie Lombardi of Aptitude Research Partners.

    Thanks to Madeline and Mollie for being a part of the HR Happy Hour Show family!

    Here are the details for Research on the Rocks debut episode:

    HR Happy Hour 253 - Welcoming Research on the Rocks to the HR Happy Hour family of podcasts

    Hosts: Madeline Laurano and Mollie Lombardi

    Listen HERE

    On the very first “Research on the Rocks” podcast, Mollie and Madeline talk about why they formed Aptitude Research Partners, what makes HCM research cool, and how thrilled they are to be part of the HR Happy Hour Family. 

    The self-proclaimed data geeks discuss some of the hottest research topics including pay equity in Massachusetts, employee communication and assessments. They also identify two areas they are focusing on this month: payroll and recruitment marketing. Oh, and they talk a little bit about farming, running, Clydesdales, rifles, and the lost art of hobbies. Don’t ask. Just listen.

    You can listen to the show on the show page HERE, or by using the widget player below:

    This was a fun and interesting show, and I hope you check it out.  

    And remember you can subscribe to the HR Happy Hour Show, Research on the Rocks, and all the HR Happy Hour Network shows on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, or your favorite podcast app. Just search for 'HR Happy Hour' to subscribe and you will never miss a show.

    Thanks again Madeline and Mollie and welcome to our HR Happy Hour family!