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    Monday
    Oct232017

    PODCAST: #HRHappyHour 299 - Dan Heath and The Power of Moments

    HR Happy Hour 299 - Dan Heath and The Power of Moments

    Hosts: Steve BoeseTrish McFarlane

    Guest: Dan Heath

    Listen to the show HERE

    This week on the HR Happy Hour Show, we welcome Dan Heath, co-author of the new book The Power of Moments, as well as previous best-sellers Switch, and Made to Stick

    On the show, Dan talked about how moments - those memorable, life-changing, and elevating moments in our work, social, and personal lives are so meaningful and memorable, and how HR and organizational leaders can craft more of these moments in our workplaces.

    Often the opportunity to create these moments happens at important life and workplace transitions - like finding out you have been hired for a new job, your first day at the new job, when you have achieved an important performance goal or milestone as so on. But too often, organizations fail to truly make these opportunities for meaningful moments live up to all they can. be. 

    Dan shared some specific examples from his research on how to create more of these important moments, and how why understanding the key elements of these moments - elevation, insight, pride, and connection, HR and business leaders can be more deliberate and intentional on creating more moments that matter at work and for employees.

    Listen to the show on the show page HERE, or by using the widget player below:

    You can learn more about the book at www.thepowerofmoments.com and order at Amazon.com here.

    This was a fantastic conversation and many thanks to Dan for joining us.

    Thanks to show sponsor Virgin Pulse - learn more at www.virginpulse.com.

    Subscribe to the HR Happy Hour Show on Apple podcasts, Stitcher Radio, or wherever you get your podcasts.

    Thursday
    Oct192017

    Digital Talent Profiles and the Blockchain

    I'm still unwinding a bit from last week's HR Tech Conference, and one of the things I like to think about after the event is more of a question I suppose. Namely, 'Where there any trends or new technologies that we should have paid more attention to at the event, and should be featured next time?'

    About a two or three weeks before the event, a friend of mine contacted me to inquire if we (the Conference), was going to showcase any Blockchain technology, and how this developing tech can or will be used in HR, Talent, or Recruiting. My short answer was 'no', as I had not really seen or heard much on that front in 2017, no one (that I can recall), specifically pitched me any blockchain powered tools to review, and frankly, I only kind of understand what the whole thing is about myself.

    For folks who may have no idea what I am talking about, from our pals at Wikipedia on the Blockchain:

    A blockchain is a continuously growing list of records, called blocks, which are linked and secured using cryptography.Each block typically contains a hash pointer as a link to a previous block,a timestamp and transaction data. By design, blockchains are inherently resistant to modification of the data. A blockchain can serve as "an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way. For use as a distributed ledger, a blockchain is typically managed by a peer-to-peer network collectively adhering to a protocol for validating new blocks. 

    This makes blockchains suitable for the recording of events, medical records, and other records management activities, such as identity management,transaction processing, documenting provenance, or food traceability

    That doesn't seem too tough to understand, right?

    A data repository that is secure, verifiable, can record and store all kinds of data types, and can be widely distributed and shared.

    Thinking about it that way, there certainly seems like their would be or could be some applications of this technology in HR and talent technologies.

    Before we jump to that, check out this example of how a form of Blockchain is being applied in the Higher Ed space - as a way to electronically distribute and validate student credentials and degrees:

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is offering some students the option to be awarded tamper-free digital degree certificates when they graduate, in partnership with Learning Machine. Selected students can now choose to download a digital version of their degree certificate to their smartphones when they graduate, in addition to receiving a paper diploma.

    Using a free, open-source app called Blockcerts Wallet, students can quickly access a digital diploma that can be shared on social media and verified by employers to ensure its authenticity. The digital credential is protected using block-chain technology. The block chain is a public ledger that offers a secure way of making and recording transactions, and is best known as the underlying technology of digital currency Bitcoin

    An interesting application of Blockchain to share and allow the verification of student degrees by employers, banks, and whomever else would need access to a student's degree information.

    To jump back to HR/Talent, it makes perfect sense then that a similar Blockchain protected employee talent profile could be created for an individual person that could include not only the degree and academic information like in the MIT example, but also work products, verifiable job histories, certifications and skills assessments, and maybe even things like recommendations and testimonials. And all stored in a secure and distributed way - perhaps a way for a candidate to share their profiles with a number of companies at once without having to go through tedious and repetitive job applications for each one. Or maybe in some kind of talent repository for temp, gig, and contract workers to submit their availability and credentials in talent marketplaces.

    There are probably going to be lots more applications of Blockchain in enterprises coming soon, and I will be on the lookout for innovative HR and talent applications for next year's HR Tech.

    If you are a provider doing something interesting in this 'Blockchain for HR' space, get in touch, I'd be interested in learning more.

    Have a great day!

    Tuesday
    Oct172017

    My HR Technology Conference Top 10 List #HRTechConf

    I'm back! 

    Sorry (not really sorry), for the dearth of posts the last 10 or 12 days, but the run-up prior, the event itself, and the necessary de-compression from the 20th Annual HR Technology Conference has kept me pretty busy.

    But after two decent nights sleep since I have been home, feel finally ready to get back to the blog and later this week, to the HR Happy Hour Show as well.

    But I didn't want to move on from  this year's  HR Tech without sharing some thoughts, observations, and most importantly thanks to the people that make HR Tech great, and who I count on every year for insight, guidance, and support.

    So in classic David Letterman style, (still the best late night host), here is my Top 10 'Chairman's Top 10 Moments at HR Tech', direct from the home office in Rochester, NY.

    Number 10...

    #VegasStong. It was great to have at HR Tech back in Las Vegas, our spiritual home, after a quick detour to Chicago in 2016. Of course, the events in Vegas the week prior made the return of the show to Las Vegas even more poignant. Many, many thanks to the HR Tech community for rallying support and donations to the Las Vegas victim's fund, and to LRP Publications  for their generous support. The HR Tech community is a close, supportive, and caring one, and it showed last week for sure.

    Number 9...

    #ChairmansHappyHour. Thanks to my colleagues, my friends, and my pals at Namely for what was a great birthday party for me and two of my best HR Tech friends. Truly a night I will not forget. Namely are really good people and my little group of Chairman's party people are the best in the industry.

    Number 8...

    Puppies. The cool folks at HighGround once again brought all the cute to the HR Tech Expo. And I don't care if you think it is a kind of cheap stunt to drive traffic. Puppies are the best. 

    Number 7...

    Opening keynoter Laszlo Bock. Super impressive person, fantastic content and message in his opening presentation. Met him for the first time in person backstage prior to the session, and he couldn't have been cooler. Look for him on an upcoming HR Happy Hour Show soon.

    Number 6...

    Closing keynoter Josh Bersin. Man, this guy just delivers. Great information, great insight, and I could have listened for another hour if we had the time. Awesome.

    Number 5...

    Our revised, revamped, and improved 'Discovering the Next Great HR Technology Company' process. Adding an element of public voting during the summer added an element of suspense and fun, and brining only the four finalists to the Conference made for a better on-site experience. This was one of my top moments of the show. Congrats to our winner Blueboard and many thanks to George Larocque, Madeline Laurano, Ben Eubanks, and Lance Haun for all the help.

    Number 4...

    The 2nd Annual Women in HR Technology Summit that was held on the Conference's opening day was an incredible event. Building on last year's launch, we had a fantastic set of presentations and panels from an amazing set of leaders in our industry. And once again, we had record interest and attendance for content, sharing, and networking at this event. The Women in HR Tech Summit was the perfect way to launch HR Tech this year, and I look forward to growing and improving the Summit next time. Special thanks go out to opening keynoter Pat Milligan, closing keynoter Christina Van Houten, and to some of the best leaders in HR Tech today - Trish McFarlane, Cecile Alper-Leroux, Gretchen Alarcon, Kirsten Helvey, and Cara Capretta for their unwavering support.

    Number 3...

    HR Tech is Global. After the show ends, I usually hang around for a bit to talk to attendees, find out what people thought about the event, and take a few deep breaths. One of the consistent things I have found is that many of the people I chat with at the end of the Conference are ones who have come from the longest way to attend. This year I met (and took photos with) people from China, Mexico, Japan, Brazil, and Australia all inside about 20 minutes. Which was awesome. Stay tuned for more HR Tech Conference global events.

    Number 2...

    Mollie Lombardi. She's probably my hero. She should be yours too. Please go to HR Gives Back and do what you can.

    And Number 1...

    The HR Tech Community. Seeing everyone in the HR Tech Conference Community all in one place. We had an amazing event for sure. I know most people are too kind to come right up to me at the event and complain, (some do), but in the 5 years I have been the program chair at HR Tech I have not received more positive feedback. I don't take credit for that - there is an incredible team of professionals at LRP that make the event hum, and there is an amazing community of HR leaders, HR tech companies, and industry analysts and press that all contribute to the event.

    HR Tech remains the Town Hall Meeting for everyone, whatever the role, who cares about how the combination of people and technology will make workplaces better, help organizations achieve their goals, and make people's work lives better. Only at HR Tech.

    Thanks for an amazing Conference and for being a part of this fantastic community.

    And make sure to mark your calendar for HR Tech #21 - September 11 - 14, 2018 in Las Vegas.

    Thursday
    Oct052017

    Notes from the road #23 - Where do I start edition?

    Quick shot from my favorite place to write these late night missives - The Delta Sky Club.

    Here's 5 things I think I think in the run up to next week's HR Technology Conference.

    5. HR Tech is in Las Vegas next week and rest assured the Conference is working with local organizations and causes to make sure that the event and our HR community support the victims, families, and anyone impacted by last Sunday's tragedy. Follow @HRTechConf on Twitter for updates.

    4. I am not a political person. I am squarely in the middle of the road on most issues. But no matter what side of the political spectrum you identify with, it is just about impossible to conclude that we as a country have it right when it comes to availability of ridiculously powerful weaponry and the potential for that weaponry to fall into the hands of folks who will cause massive damage. I don't have a solution, but I am not dumb enough to realize there is not a problem.

    3. If you are young or inexperienced enough, there is no such thing as 'legacy' enterprise software applications. Sometimes I feel like the ratings or evaluations or placements on made up quadrants or scales have more to do with author's remembrances of things past and less to do with the present or the future. Successful companies over time do not stand still. They evolve. They loosen their grip on the past. They figure out how today is different. The famous Italian race car champion once said, after having ripped the rear view mirror from his windshield, 'What's behind you, is not there.'

    2. I took a couple of 'regular' taxi rides on my trip this week. While each was perfectly fine, I couldn't help thinking I was being overcharged and inconvenienced by having to work through a complex and dumb payment process at the end of the ride. You may not like Uber and it's culture or competitiveness, but their user experience beats the alternative just about every single time.

    1. Never, ever, ever convince yourself the red eye flight from the West Coast back east is a good idea. And this is from someone who is about to get on a plane at 11:15PM PT. If you see me in person on Thursday, ask me to give you $100. I will be so punchy I will probably say ok.

    Until the next trip...

    Wednesday
    Oct042017

    The sometimes fine line between retention and regrettable turnover

    Your pal Hugh Hefner, founder of Playboy magazine passed away last week at the age of 91.

    While you probably now plenty (maybe more than you care to know) about the Playboy brand and Hef's pretty remarkable life, you might not know the impetus for him setting off to create Playboy magazine and launch 294,295 'I only subscribe for the articles' gimmicks.

    According to the Chicago Tribune's accounting of Hef's long life, at 26 years old Hef left his copy writing job at Esquire Magazine to launch Playboy after the prescient folks at Esquire denied his request for a $5 per week wage raise.

    After being rebuffed by the thrifty team at Esquire, Hef cobbled together about $8,000 of investment and borrowed funds to debut Playboy in 1953 and the rest, as they say, is bunny-eared history.

    No one is likely around who was in the meeting at Esquire when the 'We can't give him $5 more a week' decision came down, so the rest of this is pure speculation. But that kind of decision really reeks of process, politics, salary review periods formalities, and a bunch of other formal HR and talent management 'rules' that can often get in the way of managers and leaders doing right by the business.

    Hef does not get the extra fiver per week, and out the door he goes and eventually, (actually it happened pretty quickly), becomes a legend in the magazine industry. 

    Oh yeah, the same industry he was working in that thought he was not worth a sawbuck every pay periiod.

    It can be a fine line, a really fine line, sometimes between what good, valuable, productive, and 'want to be loyal' people want and what might send them out the door.

    In this case it was $5.

    In your case, it could be your best support person wanting to flex her hours once a week, or your third-best salesperson not wanting to show up at the office if he doesn't have outside calls one morning, or the 3rd year pro who is killing it in the marketing team and that you know you seriously low balled when you brought her in in 2014.

    RIP Hef. I am kind of glad Esquire wouldn't pay up back in 1953.

    I mean, if they had paid up, I would have missed LOTS of great articles...