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    Entries in Recruiting (185)

    Monday
    Mar132017

    Understanding your competition for talent

    There is a old adage, (not sure when and from whom this was first attributed to), that ascribes a breakthrough in an auto manufacturer's business strategy to them realizing that they were not in the 'car building' business, but rather they were in the 'helping people to get where they want to go' business. 

    This restatement in their fundamental purpose as a business became the key to thinking differently or more expansively about the business, their products, and the talent attraction and retention programs they would have to employ. This kind of thing is happening once again in the auto industry, as described in a piece I read over the weekend from Business Insider titled 'There's a raging talent war for AI experts and it's costing automakers millons'.

    Most of the major auto makers are now playing at some level or another in the nascent self-driving vehicle space - continuing the evolution of their business purpose and their strategy towards personal transport and away from just making cars. But, as you would expect, and the BI piece points out, these shifts have important implications for talent attraction and retention - most importantly even for those of us not in auto making, and are driving changes in the talent competition marketplace.

    From the BI piece:

    But automakers, in particular, are making massive investments in (AI) experts because they’ve begun their AI efforts late compared to traditional tech companies.

    Because deep learning has applications far beyond just self-driving cars, manufacturers are having to compete with each other and traditional tech companies.

    Only 28 companies have more than 10 deep learning specialists on staff, accounting firm KPMG wrote in a 2016 report. What's more, only six technology companies employ 54% of all deep learning specialists: Google, Microsoft, NVIDIA, IBM, Intel, and Samsung.

    "The traditional power and talent of the auto industry was based in their product development group," Gary Silberg, the head of KPMG’s automotive unit, told Business Insider. "So they would hire these amazing mechanical and electrical engineers at the top schools of engineering and they would be part of product development."

    "You can’t just turn on a dime and say, 'ok, now we are going to go recruit AI geniuses and computer scientists and expect them to come to work with us,'" Silberg continued.

    A shift in strategy, leading to the increased demand for a (apologies to Liam Neeson) particular set of skills, is changing how and with whom the auto makers are having to compete with in order to find the talent they need for these AI initiatives.  And they are not finding it easy. Instead of a GM or a Ford more or less having to only worry about each other, and maybe Chrysler, for the cream of the crop of mechanical engineers and industrial designers, they now have to compete with Google, Uber, Microsoft, Tesla and more for the really, really scarce pool of AI experts.

    In fact, as the BI piece points out, the pool of AI experts is so small at least in part due to the best AI professors themselves being recruited out of academia and into industry, leaving universities unable to meet the demand for educating more AI students.

    Want a great example of how a business strategy shift impacts your talent strategy, and requires that the talent strategy undergo a complete re-think? Look no further than this example from the auto makers. The lesson here? The next question your company needs to ask when assessing a business strategy shift, after 'Can we really do this?' is 'Can we find, attract, hire, and retain the kinds of people we need to do this?'

    Competing for talent against one or two competitors that do about the same thing as you do is fairly straightforward.

    Competing for talent against an ever-growing, deep pocketed, and fast moving ecosystem of often dissimilar companies is another thing entirely.

    Have a great week!

    Monday
    Feb132017

    PODCAST - #HRHappyHour 275 - Employer Branding on a Global Scale at GE

    HR Happy Hour 275 - Employer Branding on a Global Scale at GE

    Hosts: Steve BoeseTrish McFarlane

    Guest: Shaunda Zilich, Global Employer Brand Leader, GE

    Listen HERE

    This week on the HR Happy Hour Show, hosts Steve Boese and Trish McFarlane are joined by Shaunda Zilich, Global Employment Brand Leader for GE to talk about employer branding, recruitment marketing, and working with employees and the marketing staff to achieve employer branding goals. 

    Shaunda shared some key insights about GE's approach to employer branding, how to engage employees, hiring managers, and business leaders to help spread important employer brand messages, and to best position GE as well as communicate, support and align with business strategy. She also shares some ideas about how to get employer branding and recruitment marketing programs off and running, even with limited, (or maybe even no) budget, staff, or resources.

    You can learn more about GE at www.ge.com/careers where you can learn about GE's new initiative to place 20,000 women in technical roles.

    We also chatted about bourbon, snowstorms, and Trish and Shaunda both shared some incredibly important news of their respective company's recent announcements with the NBA. This is HUGE news (definitely to Steve anyway).

    You can listen to the show on the show page HERE, or by using the widget player below:

    This was a fun and interesting show, thanks so much to Shaunda for joining us!

    Remember to subscribe to the HR Happy Hour Show on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, and all the podcast apps - just search for 'HR Happy Hour' to subscribe and never miss a show.

    Thursday
    Feb022017

    PODCAST - #HRHappyHour 274 - The Evolving Role of the Recruiter

    HR Happy Hour 274 - The Evolving Role of the Recruiter

    Host: Steve Boese

    Guest: Dan Finnigan, CEO & President, Jobvite

    Listen to the show HERE

    This week on the HR Happy Hour Show, host Steve Boese is joined by guest Dan Finnigan, CEO and President of Jobvite, a leading provider of Recruitment technology to talk about how tech, automation, and marketing are evolving the role of the recruiter and presenting both opportunities and challenges for the modern recruiter.

    Dan shared some perspective of how recruiting technology has grown and evolved as well, and how these changes in technology, capability, and the increased availability of recruiting data are impacting recruiting today and in the future. Marketing and marketing software played a key role in these evolutions, and Dan shared some interesting perspective on the marketing/recruitment relationship.

    We also talked about some Rochester, NY delicacies, the current slate of Oscar contenders, and more.

    You can listen to the show on the show page HERE or using the widget player below, (Email and RSS subscribers click through)

    This was a fun show, thanks to Dan for joining us. And many thanks to show sponsor Virgin Pulse - www.virginpulse.com.

    Remember to subscribe to the show on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, or your favorite podcast app - just search for 'HR Happy Hour' to subscribe and never miss a show.

    Wednesday
    Jan182017

    PODCAST - #HRHappyHour 272 - Humanizing Employee Background Checks

    HR Happy Hour 272 - Humanizing Employee Background Checks

    Hosts: Steve BoeseTrish McFarlane

    Guest: Brian Monahan, Co-Founder, Inflection

    Listen HERE

    This week on the HR Happy Hour Show, Steve Boese is joined by Brian Monahan, Co-Founder of Inflection, providers of the innovative employee background check solution GoodHire. GoodHire, named a 'Top HR Product of 2016' by Human Resource Executive Magazine, takes a fresh, innovative, and important approach to employee background checks, one that humanizes and democratizes the process, making the process and the data more transparent, and providing candidates and employers better opportunities to engage. 

    With an incredibly large, (and increasing), amount of candidates in the US having some kind of 'flag' or potentially disqualifying item in their backgrounds, the need for employers to better understand these items, and for candidates to provide feedback and context about these events has probably never been more important. With unemployment continuing to fall, and with more and more employers having trouble filling their openings, perhaps it is time to re-think background checking altogether. Brian shares his motivations behind the creation of GoodHire, as well as some perspective and insights on why this new way of looking at candidates is needed now.

    You can listen to the show on the show page HERE, or by using the widget player below: (email and RSS subscribers click through)

    Learn more about GoodHire at www.goodhire.com.

    This was a fun and informative show, we hope you like it!

    Thanks to sponsor Virgin Pulse - www.virginpulse.com

    Subscribe to the HR Happy Hour Show on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, or your favorite podcast app - just search for 'HR Happy Hour' to subscribe and never miss a show!

    Wednesday
    Nov232016

    HRE Column: On Recruitment Marketing

    Here is my semi-frequent reminder and pointer for blog readers that I also write a monthly column at Human Resource Executive Online called Inside HR Tech that can be found here.

    This month, in the aftermath of the recent Talent Acquisition Technology Conference and thinking about all the innovative and potentially disruptive HR and talent acquisition technology solutions that continue to appear in the market, I thought about how much I have heard and seen lately about the concept or category of 'recruitment marketing.'

    Both at Talent Tech and at the recent Smashfly Transform event, the strategies, tactics, and technologies that HR and talent acquisition leaders are employing to define and communicate their unique employer brand and value proposition, as well as find, engage, and convert their targeted candidate communities were on full display. This field or category of recruitment marketing has seemingly emerged from the combination or confluence of a tight labor market, powerful and purpose-built technologies, and HR and talent acquisition strategies that are leaning heavily on consumer marketing precepts and concepts. 

    It is a really exciting, interesting, and fast-moving time in this new recruitment marketing space, and I thought it would be fun and hopefully valuable to share with HR Executive readers my thoughts about this new and emerging space. I came up with a few observations for my latest HR Executive column.

    From the HRE piece:

    One of the highlights of the recently concluded Talent Acquisition Technology Conference was the emphasis on recruitment marketing as an emerging new recruiting discipline. The definition of recruitment marketing is pretty straightforward: "the strategies and tactics an organization uses to find, attract, engage and nurture [sought-after people] before they apply for a job, called the pre-applicant phase of talent acquisition." (As an aside, you know a new concept has "arrived" when it has a Wikipedia page for its definition.)

    In some ways, recruitment marketing is just the natural extension of the widely discussed "HR should act more like marketing and/or sales" argument that has become popular in recent years. While that argument has indeed proven durable, it may not always be appropriate in all cases, as George LaRocque from HRWINS, one of the conference speakers, pointed out. LaRocque correctly showed that, while most consumer marketers serve only their ultimate external customers, recruiting leaders and recruiters often serve several kinds of customers: candidates, hiring managers, and even HR and organizational leaders.

    But even if there is not a perfect analogy between recruiting and sales/marketing, many progressive organizations and talent-acquisition leaders are successfully using consumer-marketing strategies, tactics and approaches to more effectively "market" their organizations and employment opportunities to potential candidates. This discipline of recruitment marketing has indeed emerged and grown more prominent in just the last few years and since not all HR leaders might be completely familiar with the concept and approach, I'd like to explore at least a few important points and share some thoughts on how HR and organizational leaders can begin to incorporate these ideas into their talent acquisition strategies.

    Why is recruitment marketing different than just posting job ads?

    In her closing keynote at the conference, Stacy Zapar presented a comprehensive review of the many strategies organizations can and perhaps should employ to more effectively define, communicate and market their unique employer brand and employee value proposition to the candidate marketplace. While posting specific job ads on the company careers page and ensuring these ads are distributed to additional outlets such as Indeed or LinkedIn are certainly part of most organization's candidate-attraction strategies, Zapar correctly emphasized that these efforts are only a small part of the optimal overall recruitment-marketing strategy.

    Read the rest at HR Executive online...

    Good stuff, right? Humor me...

    If you liked the piece you can sign up over at HRE to get the Inside HR Tech Column emailed to you each month. There is no cost to subscribe, in fact, I may even come over and rake your leaves car or clean out your gutters or even help you re-purpose the Thanksgiving leftovers. 

    Have a great, long Thanksgiving weekend!