Quantcast
Subscribe!

 

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

 

E-mail Steve
This form does not yet contain any fields.
    Listen to internet radio with Steve Boese on Blog Talk Radio

    free counters

    Twitter Feed
    Wednesday
    May032017

    PODCAST - #HRHappyHour 284 - Transforming HR with Technology, Live from Talent Space 2017

    HR Happy Hour 284 - Transforming HR with Technology, Live from Talent Space 2017

    Host: Steve Boese

    Guests: Bailey Borzecki, Dogfish Head Brewery, David Mennie, Saba

    Listen to the show HERE

    This week on the HR Happy Hour Show, Steve Boese is Live at Talent Space Live 2017 and talks with Bailey Borzecki, HR Inspirations Manager of Dogfish Head Brewery and David Mennie, VP of Product Management of Saba about how HR and talent management are being transformed through technology at Dogfish Head. Bailey shared some of the growth story at Dogfish Head from a startup to a 350-person organization spanning 36 states. Technology plays a key role at the company to support goal setting and goal alignment, to make manager-employee 1-1 meetings more productive and effective, and in fostering Dogfish Head's collaborative culture bases on feedback.

    Additionally, we talked about the importance of user experience and user adoption, the best ways to use technology to facilitate employee engagement, and whether or not Bailey is the only 'HR Inspirations Manager' in America. Steve also shared some early HR Happy Hour tales and his long-time partnership with Halogen Software, (now a part of Saba).

    You can listen to the show on the show page HERE, or by using the widget player below:

    This was a really fun and interesting show, we hope you think so too.

    Thanks to Bailey and David for joining the show and thanks to Saba for having us out at the event.

    Be sure to check out show sponsor Virgin Pulse - www.virginpulse.com to learn more.

    Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher and all the podcast apps - just search for 'HR Happy Hour' to subscribe and never miss a show.

    Monday
    May012017

    The five kinds of office environments and what they really say about your company

    Caught the news this morning that Apple begun moving employees into its new, futuristic, spaceship-looking, and $5 Billion costing campus in Callifornia last week.

    The space (or space ship) seems to be by all accounts incredible, (and I suppose for $5B it had better be), and reading the article over and looking at some of the pics of the new Apple campus got me to thinking about the various office spaces that I have worked in or at least have visited in my career. 

    And honestly, while each office space is unique, and different in its own way, I think that they all can be broken down and places in one of just a few categories. Let's say five.

    Here are the five kinds of office environments as I see it,an example of a typical company with that kinds of office set up, what the company thinks their offices say about them, and what each type of office really says about you, the company, their aspirations, and maybe even their future.

    Here goes....

    1. We don't have ANY offices  100% virtual baby. I'm having a staff meeting from the beach in Majorca.

    Example: Automattic, Buffer, GitHub

    What the company thinks it says: We are progressive, we only want the best talent, we trust people to do their best work in the environment that suits them the best

    What it really says: There's a chance we may not qualify for a 12 month lease of decent space. And your Mom or Aunt Sally has almost certainly never heard of us. But if we disappear, it won't make too much of an impact, since we were never really 'here' anyway.

    2. Class 'A' space in the office park out near the airport

    Example: Tons of them - think logistics, insurance, regional telecom companies, pretty much anyone the developer can find

    What the company thinks it says: We care about our employees enough to have them work in a clean, bright, and completely non-confrontational place. If the space is comfortable and has ample parking, then it is all good.

    What it really says: We have just about zero personality or culture. Check that - we can add a 'culture' board to the break room wall, near the microwave. That will work. Class 'A' office space is like a Honda CRV. Sure, it will get you where you need to go, but you will remember exactly nothing of the journey. 

    3. Big city, downtown, high rise (especially when relocating from Class 'A' space out in the middle of nowhere)

    Example: Boeing, General Electric, McDonald's

    What the company thinks it says: We want to attract more millennials who want to live and work in large cities with lots to do and see - arts, restaurants, sports, night life, etc. We also like to see the company name on a big tower. We also want to attract a more diverse, technically savvy workforce while we are at it.

    What it really says: We can't recruit anyone younger than 40 to come to work in McMansionville 24 miles outside of the city. We also like to see the company name on the side of a giant building.

    4. Common plan! Exposed brick! Ping Pong! Kegerator! (Did I mention the exposed brick?)

    Example: Every Series A funded tech startup in San Francisco or New York

    What the company thinks it says: We are cool! We are fun! We like to work hard and play hard! We don't care about hierarchy here, the CEO sits at the same communal table we all do! And we like exposed brick!

    What it really says: Common plan spaces are way cheaper than building out personal offices, rent at the converted warehouse was almost nothing, (a lot less than in the McDonald's tower), after about 4 days everyone will invest in new noise cancelling/don't talk to me I am trying to work headphones, and my gosh are Josh and Tim ever not playing ping pong! I don't have a snarky remark about the kegerator. That would be pretty cool to have.

    5. Money is no object. I mean, NO object.

    Example: Apple's new campus

    What the company thinks it says: We have more money, power, influence, and gravitas than anyone. We can do whatever we want. We don't care what you think.

    What it really says: We have more money, power, influence, and gravitas than anyone. We can do whatever we want. We don't care what you think.

    $5B large on a new office? Must be nice.

    That kind of scratch would buy a lot of ping pong tables.

    And keep everyone's kegerator filled for a long, long time.

    Have a great week!

    Sunday
    Apr302017

    Juniors, ranked

    There seems to be a lot more 'Juniors' or if you prefer, 'Jrs.' around lately. I am not really sure why. But I heard a couple of guys on a podcast toss around some of their favorite Juniors, I thought it made sense to take 8 minutes on a rainy Sunday to set down a marker.

    Thus, here is your unscientific, incomplete, unresearched, and 100% accurate break down of the 'Junior's that matter.

    10. Ed Begley, Jr.

    9. Cuba Gooding, Jr.

    8. Ken Griffey, Jr.

    7. Sammy Davis, Jr.

    6. Junior Mints

    5. Cal Ripken, Jr.

    4. Junior Soprano

    3. Dale Earnhardt, Jr.

    2. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    1. Junior's Cheesecake

    Of course you could disagree with this list, but you would be wrong.

    Happy Sunday.

    Thursday
    Apr272017

    PODCAST - #HRHappyHour 283 - Compliance in a Changing HR Landscape

    HR Happy Hour 283 - Compliance in a Changing HR Landscape

    Host: Steve Boese

    Guest Co-host : Madeline Laurano

    Guests: Angela Lockman, Kristin Lewis - Equifax Workforce Solutions

    Listen HERE

    This week on a special HR Happy Hour Show recorded live from the Equifax Forum 2017 in Scottsdale, Steve Boese and guest host Madeline Laurano are joined by Kristin Lewis and Angela Lockman from Equifax Workforce Solutions on the challenges for HR leaders in keeping up with changing laws, regulations and ensuring compliance in what is a fast-moving and uncertain environment.

    Angela and Kristin shared their unique point of view from the perspective of the leading provider of compliance solutions for HR and organizations on topics such as health care reform, immigration policy changes, and potential tax reform. They shared how Equifax works with employers to help them navigate these issues, as well as how Equifax works with government and regulators to endure that they understand and appreciate the employer point of view and the impact on employers.

    We also talked about how onboarding of new employees is changing from one that for a time seemed to focus primarily on engagement and acculturation, to one where these compliance steps have become even more critical. 

    You can listen to the show on the show page HERE, or by using the widget player below:

    You can't do any 'strategic' HR or talent management unless until I9, eVerify, Visa Management, ACA reporting, WOTCs - are in line. Equifax is the leading authority in this space.

    Thanks to Angela and Kristin for sharing their expertise and thanks to the Equifax team for hosting the show.

    Please check out show sponsor Virgin Pulse - www.virginpulse.com.

    Subscribe on iTunes and everywhere podcasts can be heard - just search for 'HR Happy Hour'.

    Tuesday
    Apr252017

    Notes From the Road #21 - Friendly Skies Edition

    I was waiting for an early morning flight today (on Delta, the best airline in the world), and heard a gate announcement from across the terminal for a United flight that was also soon to depart. The United gate agent was seeking volunteers to give up their seats on the 6AM flight to Chicago and take a later flight. With everything that has been in the news about the recent problems United has had with overbooking and removing passengers from flights, I couldn't help but wince a little as I heard the announcement. And I wasn't even on the flight. Nor that airline. Just the stench of what has been going on at United wafted across to my Delta gate. Aside - my Delta flight also was seeking folks to volunteer their seats as well. Must have been a big day to get out of Rochester today.

    But the announcements this morning, and the United follies of late made me think I hadn't done a 'Notes' post in a while, and since I KNOW you must have been waiting, on edge, for me to share my thoughts on the United stuff and air travel in general, here are my frequent flyer informed Top 10 observations/comments on the current state of the friendly skies...

    1. On the United stuff - pretty much everyone was at least partially in the wrong there. United operations should have a better plan to get its employees where they need to be. United gate staff and on-site managers should have had more leeway to increase the compensation on offer in order to coax the desired number of passengers from the flight. Airport/aviation security should have found some other way to accomplish the de-planing of the passenger that did not involve concussions and a busted up face. And finally, despite the unfairness of it all, the passenger in question, once three airport security staff boarded the plane and requested he de-plane, had to comply. He should have been mad. He probably should have dropped a F-bomb or two. But he should have left the plane and taken up his case back at the gate. On board an aircraft trapped with 100 other folks in close quarters who have nothing to do with this incident is no place to decide to hold your own sit-in protest. 

    2. I think an underrated element of the air travel experience is the newness of the aircraft itself. The plane I am on now is really, really new seeming. It almost has that new plane smell still. Creates such a positive feeling right from boarding when the plane is new(ish), and not one of those dreary, run-down, relics from 1987. 

    3. I know this is easy to forget, but another thing that would make the overall experience better is for everyone to realize that you are not the only person on this flight, and unless you are the pilot, you are also not the most important person on this flight. You know what? We all have connections to make! We all sat through the turbulence over Colorado. We all had to endure the four hours to LAX with the terrible wifi. Treat everyone nicely, we are all in this misery together.

    4. But given that we are all miserable, we can't take that out on the individual employees of the airline - gate agents, flight attendants, customer service folks - any of them. Ninety-five percent of the airline staff are giving their best effort to get us where we want to go - safely, on-time, and as comfortably as conditions, (which none of them created) allow. Sure, can an airline worker have a bad day? Be rude? Of course. But so can the guy at the gas station, the clerk at the DMV, and the passenger in Seat 17C who keeps hitting the call button to ask for another ginger ale. 

    5. Air travel is a volume business. Delta, American, Southwest, and United, (the Big 4), might carry 125 million passengers each year. If they are lucky, they will make $6 of profit on each passenger (it is often less). So even if you think your $1700 fare to SFO was really expensive, the airline barely makes enough to cover the costs of getting you there. So like your local grocery store, volume and thin margins is how airlines make money. I think some of the disconnect in the air travel experience is we see our fares as big-ticket purchases, but the airline sees us all as contributors of $6 to the bottom line.

    6. It is never a good idea to argue with the TSA. See point #4 - the person manning the scanner or waving the magic wand or doing the patdowns did not make the rules. The process is often ridiculous, but the time and place to make your stand is not at 5:30AM with 72 people in line behind you who just want to make their flights. Write your Congressperson if you don't like what goes on at airport security.

    7. No matter what scheme an airline uses to manage the boarding process, (line up with numbers, line up in groups, high status first/lower status next, etc.), boarding will be probably the worst aspect of the flying experience. This is mostly our, (the collective we) fault. We lug too many things on the plane, we can't count rows, we have to position phones, tablets, e-readers, magazines, boxes of Good n' Plenty just so at our seats before we sit down. Just please, for the love of all that is holy, stash your bag under the seat, don't try to stuff the roller bag where it clearly will not fit, and just sit down. There is nothing more likely to make you weep for humanity than to watch 120 of us attempt to board a plane.

    8. You do not, under any circumstances, need to make a phone call telling someone 'We just landed' the SECOND after the wheels touch down. I promise you that call can wait 7 minutes until we are at the gate and getting off the plane. Trust me.

    9. Your bags will almost certainly not get 'lost' or even delayed. In 2015 the USA rate of lost luggage was about 3 per 1,000 passengers, a 10% reduction from 2014. Delta (and American I think) now allows you to track the movement of your checked bags via it's smartphone app. I get a little notification when my bag gets placed on the plane, when it is switched to my connecting flight, and when it is unloaded at the claim area. Will you be one of the 3 out of 1,000 who has an issue with your bag? There's a 99.7% chance you will not. So get over that one time in Indianapolis nine years ago when your bag went missing and it had to be delivered to the Fairfield Inn a couple of hours later. You were fine.

    10. There are going to be times where you miss your flight, when weather or mechanical issues cancel the flight, when you are stuck in a middle seat between two guys who are the size of a WWE tag team, or when there's a crying baby, no wifi, or the plane has run out of red wine. That is just how it is. But remember none of those things are happening to you, they are happening to all of us too.

    And it could be worse. Remember that 27 hour drive to DisneyWorld when you were a kid? And Dad threatened to turn the car around about 19 times? And your brother got car sick on your Keds?

    Think about that compared to that crowded, stuffy, 2 hour 32 minute flight where you watched Moana and had some honey roasted peanuts and a Sprite.

    That's it, I am out. Safe travels out there.