Quantcast
Subscribe!

 

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

 

E-mail Steve
This form does not yet contain any fields.
    Listen to internet radio with Steve Boese on Blog Talk Radio

    free counters

    Twitter Feed

    Entries in HR (470)

    Wednesday
    Nov112015

    Revolutionary HR Tech: Part 2 - The Cult of High Potential - #HRevolution

    Note: For the rest of this week, (or longer if I can't manage to get it all done in time), I am going to run a short series of four posts inspired by a session at last weekend's HRevolution event in St. Louis that I facilitated along with the fantastic Mike Krupa. 

    In the session, we asked four teams of attendees to imagine, envision, describe, and articulate a new (or at least new to them), kind of revolutionary HR technology solution that would improve or enhance some aspect of HR, talent management, recruiting, strategy, etc.

    The teams were each given a context to work in that roughly correspond to the major sub-types of HR technology tools today: Administration, Talent Management, Culture/Brand, and finally Insight/Analytics. The teams came up with some really clever and thought-provoking ideas in a really short time, and I thought it would be fun to share them (as best as I can recall them), here and try to keep the HRevolution discussions on this topic moving forward. We will consolidate all 4 revolutionary HR tech ideas into one paper that we will post here and on theHRevolution site as well.

    Ok, let's hit the first HR tech idea - from the 'Talent' team, an idea for a new technology that I will call 'Higher and Higher Potential Identification.'

    First off, while this team had the most amusing on stage pitch for their idea, I am going to take the liberty of skipping over the 'religious' (and funny), overlay to their idea and focus on the real talent management issue that the 'Talent' team correctly and at least initially landed on that was the focus of their Revolutionary HR Tech.

    And that issue is one that just about every HR/Talent professional has had to wrestle with at some point - how to help managers and other leaders, (and HR itself), get better at the identification and cultivation of so-called 'High Potential' employees. On 99% of the 9-box grids that HR or Talent Management technology providers have rolled out, the two axes that form the grid upon which employees are plotted are 'performance' and 'potential'. And while the argument on how or even if to determine 'performance' is a never-ending and voluminous debate, the 'potential' side of the equation seems to get less attention and consideration.

    So the 'Talent' team's essential idea was a technology solution, which would have several elements - assessments, analysis of interactions, identification of profile traits that might be suggestive, and even a wearable piece of technology that would help to build up a kind of 'potential' score for each employee. This potential score would be tied to additional opportunities and developmental exercises as the employee's potential score continued to grow, to the point in time where they (hopefully), maximize their potential in their organization and role. Other, external metrics like business performance, engagement indicators, even practical data sets like attendance and health care claims could be compared to these potential measurements to determine if active and intentional interventions to increase and finally maximize employee contributions based on their greatest potential would be worthwhile.

    It was a pretty big, audacious idea (especially in that the Talent team only had 20 minutes to conjure it), and I think it is one that has been really neglected in the HR Technology space.

    Could we actually build a technology that would truly be successful at assessing and cultivating potential? I am not sure, but if we could, it would certainly be a Revolutionary HR Technology.

    So that is the second idea, stay tuned in the next few days for what the Culture, and Insights teams cooked up.

    Final note: Big, big thanks to our HRevolution 2015 sponsors - GloboforceQuantum Workplace, and The Arland Group

    Tuesday
    Nov102015

    Revolutionary HR Tech: Part 1 - Clean Data for All - #HRevolution

    Note: For the rest of this week, (or longer if I can't manage to get it all done in time), I am going to run a short series of four posts inspired by a session at last weekend's HRevolution event in St. Louis that I facilitated along with the fantastic Mike Krupa. 

    In the session, we asked four teams of attendees to imagine, envision, describe, and articulate a new (or at least new to them), kind of revolutionary HR technology solution that would improve or enhance some aspect of HR, talent management, recruiting, strategy, etc.

    The teams were each given a context to work in that roughly correspond to the major sub-types of HR technology tools today: Administration, Talent Management, Culture/Brand, and finally Insight/Analytics. The teams came up with some really clever and thought-provoking ideas in a really short time, and I thought it would be fun to share them (as best as I can recall them), here and try to keep the HRevolution discussions on this topic moving forward. We will consolidate all 4 revolutionary HR tech ideas into one paper that we will post here and on the HRevolution site as well.

    Ok, let's hit the first HR tech idea - from the 'Administration' team, a tool called 'Oscar.'

    The idea: Every HR tech project plan starts or has near the start, a step called 'Clean up the data.' And that step is miserable. Over time and with growth, most companies possess numerous systems for HR and workforce processes and functions. And with the growth of an organization's systems footprint, the challenge to keep data not just in synch across systems, but to ensure the data is 'clean' (accurate, up to date, correctly formatted, validated, etc.), becomes daunting.

    While the Admin team is aware that there are some existing HR technology solutions that help integrate HR data across systems, the team felt like simple file-transfer type information from System 'A' to System 'B' is not good enough. After all, if the Employee's date of birth is not correct in System 'A', then sending over that bad piece of data to System 'B' does nothing to help with the real issue - inaccurate employee and workplace data that can lead to a myriad of downstream problems.

    So that is were 'Oscar' comes in. 

    Oscar is a tool that would sit over an organization's existing HR technology solutions and would serve to monitor, audit, validate, and clean, (or at least raise exceptions as needed), the core elements of the organization's HR data set. Think employee names, dates of birth, employee ID numbers, locations, salary, hours, and many more potentially. These kinds of data elements usually exists in multiple platforms, systems, and can be acted upon in numerous ways, which often results in data getting out of alignment, or 'dirty'. Oscar would learn where to look for these conditions, and raise alerts to the needed administrators, HR analysts, managers, and employees as needed to ensure action is taken before 'bad' data gets propagated.

    Think of it as a kind of an HR-based identity theft monitoring tool that instead of being on the lookout for a gang of shady credit-card spoofing thieves, instead is constantly waiting patiently and vigilantly for bad HR data to raise it's ugly head, and to take action to stamp it down.

    I think this is a cool idea, and definitely one that HR pros, especially in larger organizations would love.

    Would it be complicated to build? Sure.

    Does it, or elements of it, probably exist in other tools already? Maybe.

    But is it a 'revolutionary' idea for HR tech? Most definitely.

    So that is the first idea, stay tuned in the next few days for what the Talent, Culture, and Insights teams cooked up.

    Final note: Big, big thanks to our HRevolution 2015 sponsors - Globoforce, Quantum Workplace, and The Arland Group

    Monday
    Nov092015

    PODCAST - #HRHappyHour 224 - iCIMS and Talent Acquisition Technology

    HR Happy Hour #224 - iCIMS and Talent Acquisition Technology

    Hosts: Steve BoeseTrish McFarlane

    Guests: Madeline Laurano, Colin Day, Adam Feigenbaum

    Recorded Wednesday November 4, 2015

    LISTEN HERE

    This week on the show, HR Happy Hour hosts Steve Boese and Trish McFarlane were at the recent iCIMS Analyst Day in San Diego, where they sat down with fellow analyst and official 'Friend of the HR Happy Hour' Madeline Laurano in Part 1 of the show, to talk about trends in HR and recruiting technology, and followed by a conversation with iCIMS CEO Colin Day, and COO Adam Feigenbaum about the state of the Applicant Tracking System, and the broader market for Talent Acquisition technology.

    You can listen to the show on the show page HERE, or by using the widget player below, (Email and RSS subscribers will need to click through). 

     

    iCIMS has developed a substantial list of customers for its talent acquisition technology suite, and has made a commitment to talent acquisition as its primary focus - sort of unique among large, established HR tech companies, many of which are or have been pushing to develop or acquire additional or adjacent capabilities.

    iCIMS has made a big bet that customers will understand and value what a provider solely focused on Talent Acquisition can offer, and on the show you can hear direct from iCIMS execs on why they have elected to stick with their core competency and how that benefits their customers.

    This was a really interesting and fun event. Thanks to iCIMS for having myself and Trish out at the event, and also thanks to Madeline, Colin, and Adam for taking the time to be a part of the HR Happy Hour Show.

    And don't forget the HR Happy Hour Show is available on iTunes, and on all the major podcast player apps for iOS and Android - just search for 'HR Happy Hour' to find and subscribe to the show and you will never miss a new episode.

    Thursday
    Nov052015

    HRE Column: A Golden Age for HR Tech

    Here is my semi-frequent reminder and pointer for blog readers that I also write a monthly column at Human Resource Executive Online called Inside HR Tech that can be found here.

    As usual, the Inside HR Tech column is about, well, HR Tech, (sort of like I used to write about all the time on this blog), and it was inspired by the recently concluded HR Technology Conference.

    I once again kind of liked this month's column, (I suppose I like all of them, after all I wrote them), but felt like sharing this one on the blog because it touches upon what has been in the past a pretty popular topic with HR leaders today - how to make the most of their HR technology investments.

    Here is an excerpt from the column, HR Tech's 'Golden Age':

    If it seems like I have been a little obsessed with the just-completed HR Technology Conference and Exposition®,it's because I have been. For most of the year, I work on the planning of the conference (formats, speakers, session themes, etc.) and from speaking with so many HR solution providers, experts, analysts and HR leaders -- both before and at the event -- I have come away from this year's event amazed by the quality, depth, breadth and sheer number of options HR leaders today have at their disposal when it comes to innovative HR-technology solutions.

    I'd like to try and break down three such technologies that were on display at the HR Tech Conference, and hopefully share some thoughts on how HR leaders can take advantage of them, and of what is possibly HR tech's "Golden Age."

    HR continues to move toward becoming a data-driven discipline. While this isn't a new theme, there is movement toward more advanced HR-technology solutions for data visualization, data consolidation and tools for more data-informed decision making. At the HR Tech Conference, this trend becomes even more prevalent, given the sheer number of exhibitors and demonstration sessions. Two companies worth noting participated in our "Awesome New Tech" and "Awesome New Startups" sessions.

    Read the rest over at HRE Online..

    Good stuff, right? Humor me...

    If you liked the piece you can sign up over at HRE to get the Inside HR Tech Column emailed to you each month. There is no cost to subscribe, in fact, I may even come over and wash your car or cut the grass for you if you do sign up for the monthly email.

    Have a great day!

    Wednesday
    Nov042015

    Generations in the workplace, ranked

    I have been to a few events lately, and thus have been subject to at least some 'Generations in the Workplace' content. Since many of you might still be confused/concerned/bored to death with discussions on Generations and work, I humbly submit to you this subjective, unscientific, and 100% accurate breakdown of how the generations stack up in the workplace.Source - UNC Executive Development

    Here goes...

    5. Millennials

    4. Traditionalists/Silent Generation

    3. Whatever comes after the millennials (I know that technically these folks are not yet in the workplace but that doesn't stop people from talking about them like they are already our bosses)

    2. Baby boomers

    1. Gen X

    You can comment if you like, but if you disagree with me, then clearly you must be a Millennial.