Quantcast
Subscribe!

 

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

 

E-mail Steve
This form does not yet contain any fields.
    Listen to internet radio with Steve Boese on Blog Talk Radio

    free counters

    Twitter Feed

    Entries in wellness (16)

    Monday
    Jun052017

    PODCAST - #HRHappyHour 287 - The Business Value of Employee Wellbeing

    HR Happy Hour 287 - The Business Value of Employee Wellbeing

    Hosts: Steve BoeseTrish McFarlane

    Guest: Dr. Rajiv Kumar, Chief Medical Officer, Virgin Pulse

    Listen HERE

    This week on the HR Happy Hour show, Steve and Trish are live at the Virgin Pulse Thrive Summit and are joined by Dr. Rajiv Kumar, Chief Medical Officer of Virgin Pulse to talk about employee experience, wellbeing, and the business value of investing in employee wellbeing.

    Virgin Pulse has now become the leading provider of employee wellbeing solutions, and their commitment to the overall employee experience, the central role that employee wellbeing plays in shaping that experience is evidenced by their approach to creating engaging solutions that focus on the employee and their health.

    Rajiv shared his thoughts on how wellbeing initiatives not only drive benefits like increased retention, decreased absenteeism, and reduced employer health care costs, but also have been shown to lead to positive business outcomes - sales, productivity, market capitalization and more. He also offered some ideas to help HR and business leaders make the business case for investing in employee wellbeing programs.

    You can listen to the show on the show page HERE, or by using the widget player below, or on your favorite podcast app.

    Treat your employees right and they will treat your customers right - that idea is at the core of what Virgin Pulse is all about.

    This was a fun show and many thanks to Virgin Pulse for having us at Thrive, and for supporting the HR Happy Hour Show.

    Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts - just search for 'HR Happy Hour'.

    Monday
    Jul252016

    PODCAST - #HRHappyHour 252 - Employee Wellbeing with Chris Boyce, CEO, Virgin Pulse

    HR Happy Hour 252 - Employee Wellbeing with Chris Boyce, CEO Virgin Pulse

    Hosts: Steve Boese, Trish McFarlane

    Guest: Chris Boyce, CEO, Virgin Pulse

    Listen to the show HERE

    This week on the show, Trish and Steve were joined by Chris Boyce, CEO of Virgin Pulse, a provider of market-leading, technology-based products and services that help employers improve workforce health, boost employee engagement, and enhance corporate culture.

    Chris shared some insights on how HR and business leaders can evaluate and assess wellbeing and workforce health initiatives using data and analytics, and how it is important to consider measures of success beyond employer benefit costs and health care claims or participation. The most successful wellbeing programs use data to inform changes in productivity, engagement, safety, and organizational culture. There isn't a single measure for ROI on these programs, employers have to think about their unique and specific challenges to find the measures that will most impact their organizations. Chris also shared some important information around employee data privacy and how Virgin Pulse and their client organizations keep employee data private and secure, while still allowing organizational leaders to use aggregate and anonymized data to inform decision making.

    Additionally, Chris shared his thoughts on why employee and organizational wellbeing has become a more global, and holistic phenomenon, and what that means for HR and business leaders in their efforts to find, attract, develop,and retain the talent they need to meet their organizational objectives.

    You can listen to the show on the show page HERE, or by using the widget player below:

     

    This was a fun and interesting show, many thanks to Chris Boyce and Virgin Pulse for coming on. You can learn more about Virgin Pulse at www.virginpulse.com.

    Remember to subscribe to the HR Happy Hour Show on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, or your favorite podcast app, just search for 'HR Happy Hour' to subscribe and never mess an episode.

    Thursday
    Mar312016

    PODCAST - #HRHappyHour 242 - Big Ideas for Employee Benefits in 2016

    HR Happy Hour 242 - Big Ideas for Employee Benefits in 2016

    Recorded Wednesday March 30, 2016 at the Health & Benefits Leadership Conference

    Hosts: Steve BoeseTrish McFarlane

    Guest: Nate Randall, President and Founder, Ursa Major Consulting

    Listen to the show HERE

    This week on the show Steve sat down at the Health & Benefits Leadership Conference with Nate Randall, President & Founder at Ursa Major Consulting to talk about three big ideas and trends in employee benefits that Nate is seeing as he works with organizations around the country. 

    Nate shared some ideas around managing benefits in a global and distributed environment, and the challenges that can present. We also talked a little about use of Private Exchanges for employee benefit coverage, and some considerations that employers should take into account when evaluating this model. Finally, we spent some time discussing the new trend of employers offering Financial Wellness programs for their employees, and some important factors employers need to consider before deploying these kind of programs.

    Nate also shared some insights from one of his former roles at Tesla Motors, and the challenges they faced in scaling up the organization from under 1,000 employees to over 13,000 in a very short time.

    You can listen to the show on the show page HERE, or using the widget player below:

    This was an interesting and informative show with one the the industry's leading experts and thinkers on employee benefits - we hope you will check it out.

    Reminder - you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and all the podcast player apps for iOS and Android - just search for 'HR Happy Hour' to subscribe and never miss a show.

    Wednesday
    Mar302016

    #BenefitsConf Opening Message: Meet people where they are, not where you want them to be

    I am out at the 4th Annual Health & Benefits Leadership Conference for the next few days and will (if plans don't get derailed because, well, Vegas), be sharing some ideas and highlights from the event, including at least one HR Happy Hour Show from the event.

    The opening keynote at the show was given by Alexandra Drane, Co-Founder of Eliza Corp and was titled Mentioning the Unmentionables: Is 'Life' the Missing Link?', an examination of where health and wellness approaches have possibly been misaligned with the needs, desires, and actual, practical situations and lives of the people the healthcare industry is trying to serve.

    Let's unpack that a little bit by referring to a chart we have all seen a thousand times, Maslow's hierarchy, and one that Ms. Drane referred to several times during her talk. Take a look at my (slightly out of focus) pic of the chart below, and then some FREE comments from me on the key points of the talk after that. Note: the person on the lower right of the pic is an artist doing a sketch of the talk in real time - really pretty cool!

    Alexandra's primary message on where health and wellness initiatives have gone wrong is in that so many of the efforts and outreach have been focused on individual and employee behavior modification that impact and reside at the very peak of the self-actualization pyramid - ignoring the fact that many, if not most people are wrestling with life issues much further down.

    We (or our employers), bug people to exercise more frequently, to eat healthier, to make sure they are up to date on all preventive medical screenings, etc., but often do not even attempt to address the myriad of issues that would prevent people from even thinking about doing more exercise or the other things that happy, secure people can spend time on.

    These are very basic, and fundamental issues and challenges like elder or child care, financial challenges and troubles, divorce, lack of intimacy, or even something as elementary as loneliness or disconnection from people.

    These issues, she argued, are the more important drivers that lead towards negative health outcomes that manifest in 'real' diseases like diabetes, alcoholism, heart disease, hypertension, and many more. And trying to motivate people into behavior changes that might lead to say a reduced risk of diabetes will not be effective if they are completely stressed out with family or personal crises that dominate their ability to cope.

     

    Until we are able to meet people where they are, many if not most of them dealing with tremendous pressures, stress, and personal challenges in their real lives, will we be able to better provide tools, resources, support, and empathy needed to try and move them to where we want (and hope) they can be - as people who can actually take the time to jog for 45 minutes a day, and spend an extra hour at home each night preparing healthy meals.

    It was a really important message I think, and one we'd all be wise to remember.

    People are really complex. Life can really suck sometimes. And the combination of the two makes trying to drive behavior change much, much more than just suggesting they choose a salad instead of a Big Mac.

    Thanks to Alexandra Drane for such an interesting and compelling talk this morning. 

    Friday
    Mar182016

    CHART OF THE DAY: The End of Soda (or Pop, if that's how you roll)

    Quick shot for a busy Friday, today's chart is from our pals at Business Insider and shows what BI calls an 'epic' (I'd say it is more 'moderate') decline in per capita soda (or pop) consumption in the USA over the last 18 years.

    Here is the chart, and after that, as always, some FREE commentary from me after the data:

    The headline number is that per capita soft drink consumption has declined from a peak of 53 gallons in 1997 all the way down to 40 gallons in 2015. So just about a 25% decline. Still 41 gallons is a lot of soda, (observed as I down my second Diet Dr. Pepper of the day).

    Why is this important? I am note sure it is, but to me it is at least interesting.

    Could it be, at least by this one measure, the public is finally getting more concerned about the ill effects of the consumption of empty calories from sugary drinks? Or maybe the focus on employee wellness and well-being by lots and lots of organizations is having a positive impact on people's habits with respect to soft drink consumption? Perhaps it's a generational thing. Do 14 year olds like to drink Coke or Mt. Dew?

    Of could it be a simple lack of innovation by the soft drink makers themselves? After all, while we love and praise innovative companies, the second that Coke or Pepsi messes about with the formula or our favorite drink the backlash is immediate and the outrage is enormous.

    Who knows for sure? But as an observer of the world, I find it interesting for sure. Perhaps you do as well.

    Have a great weekend!