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    Entries in HR (357)

    Monday
    Jun052017

    PODCAST - #HRHappyHour 287 - The Business Value of Employee Wellbeing

    HR Happy Hour 287 - The Business Value of Employee Wellbeing

    Hosts: Steve BoeseTrish McFarlane

    Guest: Dr. Rajiv Kumar, Chief Medical Officer, Virgin Pulse

    Listen HERE

    This week on the HR Happy Hour show, Steve and Trish are live at the Virgin Pulse Thrive Summit and are joined by Dr. Rajiv Kumar, Chief Medical Officer of Virgin Pulse to talk about employee experience, wellbeing, and the business value of investing in employee wellbeing.

    Virgin Pulse has now become the leading provider of employee wellbeing solutions, and their commitment to the overall employee experience, the central role that employee wellbeing plays in shaping that experience is evidenced by their approach to creating engaging solutions that focus on the employee and their health.

    Rajiv shared his thoughts on how wellbeing initiatives not only drive benefits like increased retention, decreased absenteeism, and reduced employer health care costs, but also have been shown to lead to positive business outcomes - sales, productivity, market capitalization and more. He also offered some ideas to help HR and business leaders make the business case for investing in employee wellbeing programs.

    You can listen to the show on the show page HERE, or by using the widget player below, or on your favorite podcast app.

    Treat your employees right and they will treat your customers right - that idea is at the core of what Virgin Pulse is all about.

    This was a fun show and many thanks to Virgin Pulse for having us at Thrive, and for supporting the HR Happy Hour Show.

    Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts - just search for 'HR Happy Hour'.

    Tuesday
    May302017

    CHART OF THE DAY: Which matters more, Google or Facebook?

    Apologies for not being more clear on the question in the post title, a better way to phrase it would be this:

    Which source send the most/best referral traffic to your online content - Google or Facebook?

    The answer, and the consultant in me loves this, is really 'It depends.'

    And what it depends on is the kind/type of content you are publishing, and is the subject of today's Chart of the Day.

    As always, and by popular demand, first the data, then some pithy, wise, and FREE comments from me:

    Here goes...

    Interesting, no?

    (Let's pretend it is interesting and proceed).

    1. I have to admit being a little surprised at the edge Facebook has over Google as a source of referral traffic for many of these categories. This surprise is driven and clouded by my own personal media consumption habits I guess. I would never imagine using or relying on Facebook as a source of information for anything other than family/close friend news. And I barely use it for that. Said differently, it is a good reminder that the way you/me consume content may not be the way most people consume content. I barely use Facebook, but I have to remember most of the rest of the world does.

    2. If you are pushing any kind of mainstream, general consumption type content, and you care about how many folks consume said content, you might need to think more about how you can up your presence/reach on Facebook, and maybe be a little less concerned about SEO, (which you never really understood anyway, but that is another story).

    3. BUT... Take a look at the last content category on the above chart - Job postings. In this category Google still dominates with 7x the referral traffic as Facebook. And it even dominates 'other' (sorry other). It seems like if you are in the Recruiting business you still do need to worry about SEO after all. And you probably need to get a handle of what Google is up to with its recent and early forays into the recruiting and job search space.

    This is totally fascinating data I think. And a reminder that job postings are not (yet) the same as the rest of the content on the internet. People look for them, and find them, much, much differently than many of the other forms of content that are all over your Facebook feed.

    Interesting stuff for sure.

    Have a great week!

    Monday
    May222017

    Learn a new word: The Optimal Stopping Problem

    I caught an interview over the weekend with one of the authors of Algorithms to Live By (can't recall which of the two co-authors I heard, but it doesn't matter. Kind of like it doesn't matter which of the two guys in Daft Punk plays a particular instrument on any given track. But that is another story.), and wanted to share a new word I learned from the interview that has some relevance to HR/Recruiting.

    For this installment of Learn a new word I submit The Optimal Stopping Problem.

    From our pals at Wikipedia:

    In mathematics, the theory of optimal stopping or early stopping is concerned with the problem of choosing a time to take a particular action, in order to maximise an expected reward or minimise an expected cost. Optimal stopping problems can be found in areas of statistics, economics, and mathematical finance (related to the pricing of American options). A key example of an optimal stopping problem is the secretary problem. Optimal stopping problems can often be written in the form of a Bellman equation, and are therefore often solved using dynamic programming.

    I bolded the 'secretary problem' which, despite its dated-sounding kind of name, is the example most commonly cited when discussing optimal stopping, and as luck would have it, is directly tied to HR/Recruiting.

    The secretary problem is essentially, the question of 'Given X number of job candidates for a given position, and also given you have to make a 'hire/decline' decision on each candidate before moving to the next one, how many candidates do you need to interview in order to maximize your probability of identifying the best candidate, while minimizing the risk of making a 'bad' hire, (say by waiting too long, rejecting too many candidates, and having to settle for a candidate that is left).

    Let's say you have 10 candidates for a position. You probably wouldn’t offer the job to the first candidate you interview, because you have no idea how that candidate compares to anyone else, or the general caliber of the candidates overall . But you probably don't want to wait until the 10th candidate, because if they’re the only one left you’re going to be forced to offer them the job (or keep it unfilled), regardless of how strong a candidate they are. Somewhere in the middle of the process there must be an ideal place to stop interviewing more candidates just to see what they’re like, and make a selection. But where to stop?

    Enter the Optimal Stopping Problem. You can dig into the math here, but it turns out there is an ideal place to stop interviewing candidates, (or dating different people in order to try and choose who to marry), and it's after you have interviewed (or dated), 37% of the contenders. After you get to 37%, make a note of the 'best' candidate you have seen so far, (let's call her Mary Jane). Then, continue interviewing candidates and when you find the first one that is 'better" than Mary Jane, stop all further interviews and immediately offer that person the job.

    How it works is related to the math behind estimating where the best candidate could be in the lineup. This number, expressed as 1/e, where 1/e eventually approaches 0.368, or about 37%. By analyzing the possible distribution of talent, it also turns out that if you interview the first 37 percent of candidates then pick the next one who is better than all the people you’ve interviewed so far, you have a 37 percent chance of getting the best candidate. 

    It's a really interesting way of looking at the hiring decision making process, (as well as other processes that involve trying to make the 'best' choice amongst a number of alternative). But it makes sense somehow, even if only on an anecdotal level.

    How many times have you slogged endlessly through an interview process where after some point candidate after candidate seem the same, and certainly no better than one you saw two weeks ago?

    Or how many of us have, (maybe even privately), thought about a past boyfriend or girlfriend that 'got away' and for some reason has never been eclipsed by the series of people that you have subsequently dated?

    Knowing when to stop, and understanding the probability that you have seen the best, or close enough to it, in any decision process is an enormously valuable thing.

    In the secretary problem, and in probably a bunch of other problems too, the answer seems pretty clear - once you hit 37% you have seen enough, you won't learn much if anything else useful, and you know how to make your decision.

    It is easy to apply in a job vacancy with 10 candidates. 

    It is a little tougher to estimate just how many people you are willing/able to date in order to know when to apply the 37% cutoff.

    Have a great week!

    Monday
    May152017

    HR Tech China #2 - Five Things I'm Looking Forward To

    In a few short weeks I am heading back to China to host and speak at the 2nd Annual HR Tech China event, this year being held June 6 - 7 at the Shanghai International Convention Center in Shangai, China.

    Last year's first HR Tech China event was incredibly memorable, interesting, and valuable, especially for the US-based folks that attended, as I don't think you can even begin to understand a place, business and organizational challenges, and its people without visiting in person. And even that, in a place as large, dynamic, and complex as China only gives you a first step towards really knowing a place and your opportunities there.

    And of all the places in the world where opportunity is present, I can't think of any one with more potential than China. The economy continues to grow and modernize, the appetite for new and innovative technologies are endless, and the desire by many US companies to expand both into the Chinese market, and out of the Chinese market by local firms, is dramatically expanding. 

    If you really, truly, expect to be a global company, then you almost have to be in China, I think.

    That said, I am incredibly excited to be heading back to China and for the 2nd HR Tech China event. And since no one asked, here are the five things I am looking forward to the most about the event and the trip.

    1. HR Tech China (the event) - last year's event was really incredible, and I am sure Year 2 will be even bigger and better. With an array of local Chinese HR leaders and experts, business and economic officials, and a wide variety of both local HR tech and services providers, as well as many of the large, global HR technology companies you know well, this event is perfectly suited for the Chinese and greater Asia HR leaders. The event is first-rate, and quickly becoming a leading event in the global HR tech space.

    2. The Food - Where to start? Easily three of the top ten 'best things I have ever tasted' have been on my trips to China. Peking Duck in Beijing, Hot and Sour Soup in Hong Kong, and spicy sea snails in Zhuhai I still dream about. I am going to eat everything on this trip. 

    3. Shanghai Disneyland - C'mon who does not love Disney? On the trip back from last year's HR Tech China I had the chance to stop in Hong Kong and visit the Disney theme park there. It was really fun and a great experience, and luckily on this year's trip I am going to make time to visit the newest Disney park, this one right in Shanghai. Everything I have seen and heard about Shanghai Disney is that it is really incredible and I can't wait to see it.

    4. The Flight - So a 14 or 16 hour flight might not sound like so much fun. But think of it this way - no emails, no text messages, no one bugging you for anything for the better part of day. A book, a movie or two, a glass of wine, a little sleep - sounds like a night you can only dream of having at home these days. Enjoy the solitude while it lasts.

    5. The People - I have met and look forward to seeing again, so many great people that are a part of HR Tech China. Nowhere have I felt more welcomed. Incredibly nice, generous, curious, motivated, and smart - that is how I would describe the people I have had a chance to get to know a little. Can't wait to see them again and make some new friends. Add me on WeChat!

    I know China seems like a far away place, and it kind of is, but each time I go, (and I hope that it will be more often than once a year in the future), it seems a little closer, and a little less far away each time.

    I know this blog does get readers from Asia and Australia and New Zealand, if anyone is interested in coming to the event in June in Shanghai, send me a note via the contact form on the left side bar and I will make sure you get the information you need.

    Have a great week! 

    Friday
    May122017

    HRE Column: HR Tech Conference Preview #1

    Once again, I offer my semi-frequent reminder and pointer for blog readers that I also write a monthly column at Human Resource Executive Online called Inside HR Tech that can be found here.

    This month, as I have been wrapping up the program development for the upcoming HR Technology Conference that will be held at in October, I take a look at some of the more interesting trends and themes in HR tech that have emerged from reviewing about 450 proposals and talking with dozens of HR leaders and technology service providers. These issues demand continuing focus for HR leaders and the spotlight will be placed on them at the Conference this fall.

    So in this month's HR Executive column I examine a a few of these technologies and trends that are continuing to be top of mind for HR leaders and HRIT leaders and that will be on display at the Conference in October. There are of course a few other themes and trends that are important, but I could not fit them all into the HRE piece. I will probably touch upon some of them in next month's column.

    I am super excited of what is in store at the event and plan to share as many of the big ideas that will be showcased there in the next few months both at HRE and here on the blog as well as the HR Happy Hour Show.

    Here's a taste of the HRE piece:

    As I write this, we are about two and half weeks from the official launch of the program for the 20th Annual HR Technology® Conference and Exposition, which will be held at the Venetian Resort in Las Vegas from Oct. 10-13. Developing the program for the event consists of a combination of reviewing approximately 450 "official" speaking proposals, having dozens of discussions with potential speakers, attending numerous industry events to see speakers in person as well as connect with HR technology providers, and finally, attempting to read and review as many sources of HR tech industry news and information as time allows.

    From all of these activities, I come up with a conference program that accurately reflects the current state of HR technology in organizations, showcases innovative and forward-looking HR and HR tech thinking, and presents an event where HR and HRIT leaders can learn, see and experience all the best of HR tech in one place.

    And each year, as I close up the process of program development, I like to take a step back to examine the overall themes and concepts that have coalesced from the process in order to draw some observations and conclusions about the current (and future) state of HR technology. From that perspective, here are some key observations and themes that I have seen from this process that reveal insights into HR tech, and that act as a bit of a preview of what you can expect at the conference.

    Recruiting remains critical and competitive

    One consistent finding in my five years of conference programming has been that most new technologies that come across my desk are centered on recruiting. When companies are expanding and opportunities for growth often hinge on finding new talent, the need for new tools, approaches and processes to power more effective recruiting becomes essential.  We will continue to explore the evolution of recruiting technology and processes at HR Tech this year, with a focus on how modern technologies are enabling organizations to succeed in meeting their recruiting objectives. One specific area we will focus on is how organizations of all sizes are approaching the design, build and integration of the assortment of recruiting technologies that are available. Additionally, expect to see an incredible array of new and innovative recruiting technologies in our Startup Pavilion as well as being featured in our "Discovering the Next Great HR Technology Company" session.

    Technology powers engagement

    Employee engagement remains an important subject for organizations and HR leaders, as engagement levels have remained fairly constant -- and not very high -- for many years. But this challenge also represents an opportunity and many HR technology providers have developed solutions to address these challenges.

    Read the rest at HR Executive Online...

    If you liked the piece you can sign up over at HRE to get the Inside HR Tech Column emailed to you each month. There is no cost to subscribe, in fact, I may even come over and re-surface your driveway, take your dog for a walk, or help you weed the garden.

    Have a great day and Happy Mother's Day to all the Moms out there!